Skip to main content

About your Search

20100101
20100131
STATION
CSPAN2 20
LANGUAGE
English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 10:00pm EST
reviewing the numerous books and articles tom has written works on franklin, washington, jefferson, truman, fdr, american war, hamilton byrd will, the outstanding volume he produced to accompany a major 1997 pbs production liberty. of course the recent perils of peace which deals with the events after the surrender of the british at yorktown in 1781. a great personal memoir of your upbringing in jersey city which as you know is my home town as well so we have that in common. and so much more on the american revolution, the great leadership of george washington and his military struggles to achieve american independence and now the subject of tonight's conversation, the role of women in american history. we see this in fiction and nonfiction that you have produced over the years in the novels such as liberty tavern which came out in 1977 just to remind you of that, the difficulties in that book involving women of life during the american revolution. the officers' wives that came out in 1981 about three how west pointers and their wives to paraphrase about the resignation of these officers w
CSPAN
Jan 25, 2010 12:00am EST
washington wrote a letter to a woman named sally fairfax in 1759. she was the wife of his best friend, his good friend anyway's neighbor, george william fairfax. this letter suddenly was published in the new york herald, which was at that time in 1877 when it was published it was the biggest newspaper in america. and they've called it a washington love letter. and nobody could believe that it was real at first. and then people who know a little bit about washington's life and stuff, there were some very atchison diaries published. they discovered he had written it better for month after he had become engaged to moffit custis, who was in for the the richest widow in virginia. and this caused consternation in 1877. they couldn't believe that george washington could possibly have thought for another woman. and so, it was like a suspense story as a probe to find out what happened to this letter. and it turned out that the latter never saw the light of day. it was going to be auctioned off of the mystery man body and this appeared for 60 years. and they founded by sheer accident in the files of
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 12:00pm EST
the mothers, wives, daughters, a nd friends of the founding fathers, washington, frankli n, adams, a hamilton, jefferson, madison , a very different women. enormously interesting providing material for the rebidding stories of the founders as we mentioned before in our conversation, it is six bookspan one. with all you have done in your career, we're at a new level of writing about american history and history in general. we're all products the bar associations and those who have made our history and consequently have reached a level of interest as historical characters were books. must we researched and written about within the context of their lives. their marriages comment liaisons', all of the association's. they do not exist -- exist in a vacuum. you say far from diminishing the men and women and examination of there intimate lives will in large them for our time. with your perspective what led up to the book that has now come out? >> guest: what got me going was this idea that i had written a great many books of the revolution, over a dozen but mostly concerned with the men but yet in m
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 12:00pm EST
's learning how to be a more effective inside player in washington and dealing with the congress. and that's something that some previous fed chairman, paul volcker, alan greenspan, your time at the fed as vice chairman, you have done a lot of washington before. so i don't think it was a help that he didn't have this experience. but i think that the portfolio skills he had figuring out what to do in this instance was the most important thing that we could have asked for neh chairman at this credibly terrifying moment in our history. >> host: what about his personality? >> guest: i think that's also interesting. you know, alan greenspan, in my view, made it a little bit too much like the vatican. he was the pope that he was invaluable, and those people did know anybody else's name. and bernanke came to washington determined he said at the time to follow greenspan's policy, but to be different and greenspan. i call him in the book to be the un-greenspan. to elevate over the character of the chairman. i think actually that was a bit naÏve. but it did help him build a consensus at the fed. so
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 10:00pm EST
own inns or just play some games at... all that and more. washington post weekend live starts now. u hello and thanks for tuning in. the nfl is down to the final 2 teams as saints and colts punch their tickets to miami. this week was breaking down the games. what our panel thought about them. >> and they are putting licks on. >> he and farve, they will get to farve they take a hit and they take a licking and keep on ticking. >> farve's his ego makes him get up. once he was hurt he was throwing balls without velocity. within you look at the things that you go into the game. and he is on the jet's team. >> and very good. why didn't he play yesterday? number 21 was getting hit. lit up. and after about two big catches you bring sheppard off the bench. you stop, you go to if you can stop one of those guys garson but..., lowery. >> this the one but 21 was ate up the rest of the day. >> i see your point about manning. >> and that's not your typical you could not -- i could not pick off the street. >> peyton manning could. and he did. >> you know the one thing we have not discussed this is n
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 12:00pm EST
research was the washington navy yard, and what i do whenever i plan to go to an archive is i get in touch with the head archivist before i'm coming. and i say, this is my topic and this is what i want to do. you know, is it worth coming there? can you help me out? and that why i at least have some idea of the lay of the land before i go. well, the archivist there on the second day that i showed up, he had a little glint in his eye and he motioned me to come over. and he said, mr. schwab, he said, i have an idea for you. and he said, before i share my idea, he said what you promised me that when you finish your dissertation you will give me a copy? of the dissertation for the library. and that there becomes a book which i suspect it will, would you give us a copy of the book as well? and i said, sure. assuming you have a good idea of which i think you do. and he said well, he said, do you have time and money? to travel and do research? i said yes, i have some grants from the university. and he said well, he said, i think if you would go to various presidential libraries, perhaps starting w
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2010 10:00pm EST
inside player in washington and in dealing with the congress, and that's something some previous fed chairmen, paul volcker, alan greenspan, your time that the fed as vice chairman, you had done a lot of washington before, so i don't think it was a help they didn't have this experience but i think that the portfolio skills he had figuring out what to do in this instance was the most important thing we could ask for a fed chairman at this incredibly terrifying moment. >> host: what about his personality? >> guest: i think that's also interesting. alan greenspan in my view made the fed a little bit too much like the vatican. she was the pope and he was infallible and most people didn't know anybody else man. bernanke came to washington determined, he said at the time, to follow greenspan's policy but to be different the greens entry i call and in the book to be the un-greenspan. i think actually a was a bit naive but it did help him build consensus at the fed so when the time came for him to exert strong leadership to push people to do think they were not entirely comfortable with he h
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 10:00pm EST
our report on washington capital's alex ovenchin a player loaded with family and forks he has major endorsements and commercials and his own clothing line and that's just for starters. earlier we asked the hockey superstar if he is overwhelmed by all of his success. >> in washington it is a pretty cool thing. you go in a shop or you buy some stuff and shopping and people just say hey alex, good game last night, critical game. it is very fun. >> one more interesting thing, this tough guy on the ice actually admit that had he cries at movies. well, actually, so do i. go figure. finally, let's have some fun, some fast fun, some of the best work happened this year when our reporters got right in the middle of the action in this case, speeding through the turn at 120 miles per hour at the famous dover international speedway for chris miller it was time to start your engine to see if he could survive the notorious monster mile. >> chris miller and don knee knew birring here's dover international stairway, year two of the monster mile experience, got the fan experience and i'm going behind
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 9:00pm EST
discusses his bookda, tionale washington post". >> host: welcome to luke to book tv's "after words." we are talking to toss university history professor peniel joseph, who has a very compelling new book out, "dark days, bright nights" from black power to barack obama. welcome, professor joseph. >> guest: thank you. west catullus with the title means. that is a very intriguing title. >> guest: the title talks about the first to wear her black people have come from in this country really from the dark days of slavery, segregation and jim crow all the way to having the first african-american president. >> host: there was kind of a little while dee dee during the campaign that went viral and you mentioned a durham leon in the book, and it goes rosa parks sat so martin could walk so barack obama could run so that your children can fly. and that became a kind of catch phrase toward the end particularly among african-americans. you cite this and say as emotionally powerful as these words may be they make for poor history. explain that. >> guest: absolutely. the notion of rosa parks has become
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 3:00pm EST
. and so a few years ago, i was writing for the "washington post," and i realized that the 50th anniversary was coming, and if i was ever going to write the book i should do it now. so i did. and now it's out. and it's called "k blows top." the reason for the title is it's the third line of a three line headline from the new york daily news. the full headline was denied to her of disneyland, "k blows top." so he really was not allowed to go to disneyland. we could probably get into why later. >> host: but your book is very different because usually book filled with political analysis, discussion and trying to push us on all these other cold war. and you're talking about the detail, that i remember, because i was part of this khrushchev entourage. it stopped, and he was not really scared. when i was talking the other day in our library, i was scared. and then he lost his gold medal that was in train station traveling from los angeles to san francisco, and he was so happy that some american found it. it did not stolley. he returned it, khrushchev, it is your metal, please take a. and then it
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 4:00pm EST
did you see? >> guest: it was instant. i was involved in a talk radio station in seattle, washington back in 1988 cold king 1090, a very liberal radio station i might add. we can get into that story a little bit later, but immediately the first one out of the gate was rush limbaugh. rush fully understood what it was to be able to opinionated freely on the airwaves when he was in sacramento, california. he had to live under the fairness doctrine guidelines. when he located in sacramento he told me that it was amazing that there was nobody doing political talk and he said oh, this is a cakewalk. my word, what fun this is going to be. then he had to succumb to the fairness doctrine by giving an hour of the program to somebody in the community who was concerned about what he said so he had to move over and he said it was the most boring hour of radio i have ever done in my life. and, that is what was happening back in. there was no question about it. what we saw immediately was all of a sudden we could put commentators on the radio and half free opinions on the radio. we didn't have to a
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00pm EST
, with the "i have a dream" speech right here in washington, d.c. and we don't think about the king who was really much more combative, even though he was non-violent. king believed that you could use non-violence as a moral and political force, really a battering ram to transform democracy. but to say king was not combative. he was really combative. he did not believe that violence was unacceptable politically orr morally. >> host: it also is true that, everybody embraces it now, but back at the time even among african americans a lot of people did not want him coming to their towns and neighborhoods because when he left he had made life more difficult for many of the sioux had to stay behind. >> guest: absolutely. and we think about king and the southern christian conference, they are the premier mobilizes of the civil-rights movement. they are not grass-roots organizers. led by stokely carmichael and in an earlier incarnation by john lewis. king goes into places like birmingham, albany, georgia, chicago,and he really stirs things up. that is what is so interesting. very, very combati
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 5:00pm EST
and the ideals of the harlem renaissance or the ideals of booker t. washington, like you make it on the basis of your own individual greatness and the ideals of seeing some sort of collective respondent? i keep thinking the three of them as belonging in that kind can of almost a middle passage, if you were, between two eras. >> guest: yes, and they were, and that's a great ox vision. -- observation. and i think because they were caught between those two eras before the 1964 civil rights act, they were already engaged in their own civil rights, personal civil rights. and i think that they all three had sort of a hell-bent energy to make themselves successful against the backdrop of segregation in america. and i think that they thought if they could fight, fight their way into the headlines, adam clayton powell in church politics around america, in the u.s. congress; sammy davis jr., nightclubs in the 1940s and '50s; and then sugar ray robinson as a pure championship athlete. >> host: and i think we're very bad at teaching history in this country. >> guest: uh-huh. >> host: and often times the
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 6:00pm EST
. "the washington post" and "the new york times" condemned his antivietnam speech at riverside and basically said almost that it was treason and king thus quote that famous line of black poetry. america was never america to me. now he gets beyond that always that is the king cullom and that he was tough-minded enough not to give an just to the emotion but to hold out the better way. so king was pretty much rafah bin this time and we've taken that all out and creating st. martin, and it is why ct dividend, reverend c. tda, one of the great men of national nonviolence who worked for sclc goode was part of john lewis's circle and all those other great people in nashville and see to vivien said that is why he didn't go to the 40th anniversary celebration of bloody sunday at selma. i wanted to be with john lewis and watch the march over the pettis bridge. but a lot king's workers didn't. the guys that got their bodies ripped apart to prepare for selma and they said this is going to be making nice and at the last minute ct vivian agreed to give a sermon. but up there in brown chapel,
CSPAN
Jan 1, 2010 6:00pm EST
the fact is, that's what the welcome back to washington. it's great to see you i think i met you halfway during your career like nine years ago or eight years ago shortly after 9/11. it's amazing to see what you've done. the success of "three cups of tea" and now a new book and i want to talk to you about the new book today and i guess my first question for you is "three cups of tea" is still a smashing success. i think it is still number four on the bestseller list and now a new book. why a new book so soon? >> well, thanks marianne. first off it's great to see you i often think back to when we first met. we were in montana. i gave a little slide show. you were thinking -- sitting on i think there were five, six people there. you were sit on a couch. you had a baseball cap on and you had some very timely questions and i didn't know who you were at the time and when we got done i remember you saying well, i work in d.c. and here's my card give me a call sometime and i'll see if i would be able to help you out zb and gave you a card later and representative from california and i really ap
CSPAN
Jan 18, 2010 12:00am EST
in washington d.c. decades ago because of his race. he was right about that. on certain level sometimes he plays history professor and chief nine just commander in chief and imparts a real lesson but for the most part he has tried to stay away from racial matters which is very impact on the african-american community especially in terms of public policy. >> there was a recent flap disclosed in a new book by two journalists called game change, the book which revealed a private conversation and harry reid had, the senate democratic leader. especially back gain obama, as saying this was a match your view calling him the fact he was a light skinned african-americans and and did not use the negro dialect unless he wanted to. there was a lot of back and forth, that. over the weekend. what do you make of that? that comment and a controversy? >> guest: it shows the complexity of the african americans when they try to judge the sincerity in terms of harry reid politically is not a right-wing politician he was neutral initially but then as a bomb a became the nominee he was a vehement supporter and now we
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 11:00am EST
the production breeding center near washington, d.c.. and best of all, i went and visited operation migration where joe duffy is teaching, his teachers are helping these crazy new migration or. i got to go out in an ultralight. so it was totally, totally fascinating. >> host: the whooping cranes of course is a burden that went completely extinct in the wild. >> guest: no, no, no. the original flock was down to 27. and they were summering in the preserve in texas. and then they nested somewhere north in candidate, but nobody knew where. and all the time the flock was getting less and less, and then one day some helicopter pilot was brunning, i don't know what he was doing, and he saw this white bird with a golden color, young. and that's where they were. they were nesting in buffalo park, canada. but this flock was down to 27. 2000-mile migration, getting less and less. if bird flu or something came along, then that would be the end of that. so that was why they needed to start a second -- a second group, but they had to teach them to migrate. they learn from their parents, and this was a new
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)